Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

MNREGS plundered by a Government of Wolves

Narada Desk | April 13, 2016 5:49 pm Print
Labourers work on a dried lake to try and revive it under the National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (NREGA) at Ibrahimpatnam, on the outskirts of Hyderabad, June 17, 2009. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder/Files

Labourers work on a dried lake to try and revive it under the National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (NREGA) at Ibrahimpatnam, on the outskirts of Hyderabad, June 17, 2009. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder/Files

The rural distress plaguing large tracts of the Indian countryside is no secret. This distress has heightened in the wake of the devastating drought that is affecting more than half of India’s 676 districts. Forget the reports coming in from grass root organizations that showcase the severity of the crisis, data from the government’s own agencies expose the horror.

For instance, Maharashtra, especially the Vidarbha and Marathwada regions, has seen 273 farmers killing themselves in the first three months of 2016 alone; this is 59 suicides more than the corresponding period from last year.

The devil hides in the details. The spurt in farm suicides even before the onset of summer is an indicator of the things to come. Large tracts of state have already gone dry; Latur is the worst hit, with water curfews imposed there.

It is in this context that welfare schemes, like Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MNREGA) end up as the only way out for millions of rural poor to subsist. And, the government now wants to deny them even that.

The Supreme Court of India observed the same while hearing a petition by Swaraj Abhiyan, an activist group, which sought relief for drought hit regions in the country. The Court examined the data provided to it by the union government and curtly told the government that the funds allocated for MNREGA are not enough to alleviate the rural crisis, worsened by the drought that is affecting more than 10 states.

The bench of Justices Madan B. Lokur and N.V. Ramana held that:

“There is a shortage of funds and this shortage is going to be severe if all states comply with 100 days of employment per household per year which at present is only at 46 days as per your data. You need to have larger budget to solve the problem of drought hit people by offering them employment”.

Ironically, the fund cut has arrived despite the current government’s complete about turn on MNREGA. It had called the act a “living monument of failure” of the previous government in its first budget. However, on the 10th anniversary of the Act, i.e. less than a year later, the same government termed MNREGA a “national pride”.

The pride, sadly, does not reflect in the numbers. Though, last year, the government enhanced the budgetary allocation for MNREGA to Rs. 38,500 crore from Rs. 34,699 crore, this has meant little on the ground, as states owe more over Rs. 10,000 crore as liability for wages that have gone unpaid during the last fiscal year. This liability leaves a mere Rs. 28,500 crore of funds available this year, around 18% lower than last year, in the face of an even more acute rural crisis.

The data exposes something bigger than the shrinking of available funds. It shows criminal disdain for the life of the rural poor who seek work under MNREGA to survive. Denying them wages on time defeats this very purpose. Sample this: the official data betrays exaggeratingly high level of delays in wage payment to workers. It shows that on time payment of wages for MNREGA work stood at a petty 27% in the fiscal year 2014-15, with the figure increasing to 45% last year.

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