×

Rs 70,000-80,000 can land you a doctor job at Delhi’s Deen Dayal Upadhyay Hospital

A letter sent to the hospital’s medical superintendent complains about a cash-for-jobs scam. Junior doctors allege that no vacancies have been advertised in the past six months.
Corruption in health department, doctor, hospital

In a latest alleged “cash for job” scam in India’s healthcare system, young doctors have accused thier senior of selling vacant posts at the Delhi government’s Deen Dayal Upadhyay Hospital, reports Mail Today.

According to the report, a letter sent to the hospital’s medical superintendent complains about a cash-for-jobs scam. Junior doctors allege that no vacancies have been advertised in the past six months.

“The first interview was conducted in November 2015. After that, the interviews have been re-conducted around five times. We were never informed about the number of vacancies,” said a doctor on the condition of anonymity.

Mail Today claims to have a copy of letter, which was written by the resident doctor’s association on May 18.

“We have received a large number of complaints from various doctors who have informed about the monetary involvement during the interviews. We have asked the administration to take immediate action in the matter,” said Dr Sumit Paria, president of the association.

A modus operandi has been identified by the doctors and a panel of three interviewed the resident doctors and rates them on various parameters.

A doctor who purportedly went through the interview process said, “We are asked to pay around Rs 70,000-80,000 if we want to get the job. The price is even higher if we want a specific department. The choice of a particular department will cost an additional Rs 20,000-30,000.”

Two years ago, in a similar incident, some of the staff posted in the labour room and private wards were purportedly caught on CCTV taking money from patients’ relatives.

“The health department is aware of the matter and the hospital administration is looking into it,” said Dr Tarun Seem, secretary, department of health and family welfare, who also heads the Delhi government’s directorate general of health services.

“A committee has been formed to look into the matter,” said Dr Savita Babbar, the hospital medical superintendent. “ But we have not got any substantial information or proof in the case. No one has come forward to accept that they bribed the doctors to secure a seat.”

From lower-division clerks to higher authorities, all are involved in this corruption, said a senior doctor. “ The administration has been ignoring the matter for a while but it’s high time now and some action should be taken,” the doctor added.

The marks accorded are written in pencil and the final signature is done by pen during interview, the doctor alleged. “This leaves scope for manipulation as the marks given in pencil can be changed any time.”

However, the hospital administration officials said, more than 10 junior resident doctors were found to be involved in illegal activities, such as running private practises alongside their government jobs. The institute sacked some of these doctors. “This letter may be a repercussion of the action we took against them,” said Dr Babbar.

Top