Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

UAE to build a man-made mountain to maximize rainfall

Narada Desk | May 3, 2016 4:11 pm Print
The United Arabian Emirates( UAE) is currently working on building an artificial mountain to maximize the rainfall. The country goes for the new project to solve the issues of water crisis.

The UAE is all set to puzzle the world by building a man-made mountain to maximize rainfall in the country. The international destination of businessmen from all over the globe that amuses us with mega projects of building sky scrapers in the deserts Like Burj Khalifa is currently in its first stage of building an artificial  mountain.
According to the National Centre for Atmospheric Research NCAR scientist and lead researcher Roelof Bruintjes, many experts from the US-based University Corporation for Atmospheric Research ( UCAR) are now busy with the “modelling study” for the project.

“What we are looking at is basically evaluating the effects on weather through the type of mountain, how high it should be and how the slopes should be,” said Bruintjes. “We will have a report of the first phase this summer as an initial step.”

As far as the Arabian countries with huge amount of desserts are concerned, mountains are of very importance for the rainfall. The moist air turns to liquid only when it touches the mountain and rises. This can be easily understood by observing the mountains where the area faces wind will rain a lot comparing to other sides.

In UAE, most years, annual rainfall is always under five inches which is very less comparing to water usage of the country. It has been a major issue in the summers in the UAE, since many laborers will have to work in the open places with a temperature upper than 100 degree.

To solve this grave issue,it was UCAR in collaboration with National Center of Meteorology & Seismology (NCMS) came forward firstly proposing a “detailed modelling study evaluating the effects of building a mountain on the weather” with a fund of $400,000.


“Building a mountain is not a simple thing,” saysBruintjes. “We are still busy finalising assimilation, so we are doing a spread of all kinds of heights, widths and locations [as we simultaneously] look at the local climatology.”
Meantime, the NCAR experts are in the search for proper place across the UAE to implement the project .
“If the project is too expensive for the government, logically the project won’t go through, but this gives them an idea of what kind of alternatives there are for the long-term future,” Bruintjes said. “If it goes through, the second phase would be to go to an engineering company and decide whether it is possible or not.”