×

Sanders hints dropping out of the presidential race

In a 23-minute speech live-streamed across the country, Sanders sounded very much like a candidate prepared to drop out of the Democratic presidential race. But the Sanders neither conceded the party’s nomination nor endorsing Clinton in the general election.

After losing out to Hillary Clinton in most of the primaries, Bernie Sanders profusely thanked his supporters and said he is looking forward to work with Hillary to advance key issues. The Senator from Vermont urged like-minded followers to run for State and local offices so they can continue the “political revolution” he began.

In a 23-minute speech live-streamed across the country, Sanders sounded very much like a candidate prepared to drop out of the Democratic presidential race. But the Sanders neither conceded the party’s nomination nor endorsing Clinton in the general election.

“The major political task that together we face in the next five months is to make certain that Donald Trump is defeated and defeated badly,” Sanders said of the presumptive Republican presidential nominee. “And I personally intend to begin my role in that process in a very short period of time.”

But “defeating Trump cannot be our only goal,” Sanders cautioned, speaking from his home town of Burlington, Vt.

The senator reiterated his call to push the issues that animated his campaign — based on income and wealth inequality — and he pledged again to maintain that effort until the Democratic National Convention next month in Philadelphia.

On 9 June, President Barack Obama endorsed Hillary Clinton. But at a rally in Washington same day, Sanders supporters were on the fence about backing Secretary Clinton in the general election.

While not bowing out of the race, he has done nothing of late to pursue the only available course left to wrest the nomination from Clinton, the party’s presumptive nominee. That would involve persuading hundreds of superdelegates who have announced their support for the former secretary of state to switch allegiances at the convention.

Instead of lobbying superdelegates, Sanders has been focusing his energy on trying to influence the Democratic Party platform and its future legislative agenda so that it looks more like the agenda on which he campaigned for president.

Sanders said he and Clinton agree on some of the issues he raised during the campaign, but on others, he said, there are major differences.

Top