Thursday, July 14th, 2016

ESPN to broadcast “Doc & Darryl’’ today on baseball legends Gooden and Darryl

Narada Desk | July 14, 2016 9:00 pm Print
ESPN’s documentary on baseball legends Gooden and Darryl will be aired today. Stay tuned to enjoy the movie by Judd Apatow and Michael Bonfiglio.

ESPN’s sports documentary series ‘30 for 30’ pays tributes to New York Mets  baseball players of 1980’s, ‘Doc’ Gooden and Darryl Strawberry in “Doc & Darryl’’. Gooden and Darryl Strawberry, were victims of drug abuse and both ended up ruining their career. The documentary will be aired today 9 p.m. EDT, said ESPN. “Doc & Darryl,” will chronicle a turbulent and now forgotten phase in the lives of yesteryear’s baseball legends, who had served a jail term for drug abuse, reported AP.

The documentary lauds the efforts of these former players of New York Mets in a realistic manner. The movie captures the intense relationships, they had shared through a discussion between these sporting giants. Gooden and Darryl tell the filmmakers that they were victims of child abuse by their dads.

They found solace in drugs and abuse and finally ended serving a jail team.

Gooden and Darryl have played a key role in transforming the New York Mets into a formidable baseball team during the 1980’s. Both players were endowed with freaking talents, but chose to squander their talents on drugs and booze, according to sports commentators.

The documentary also brings to light the amazing skills displayed by both players in the court. Strawberry’s moon hits were the rage in 80’s, and Gooden dominated the filed with his unforgettable fastball and curve.

The ESPN’ documentary sheds light on the rise and fall of these two baseball legends more as a word of caution for today’s youth.

Director’s Judd Apatow and Michael Bonfiglio, have captured the buzz of 80’s sporting world by documenting the larger-than life personalities of these giants.

The documentary also shows, how Gooden and Darryl Strawberry, eventually overcome cocaine and alcohol.

Apatow, is well known for his movies like “Knocked Up,”“The 40-Year-Old Virgin” and “This is 40,” and had followed the trail of the Mets team for years. Apatow teamed up with filmaker Bonfiglio on a project, and decided to work on the ESPN film with him.