Friday, August 26th, 2016

This amazing new upgrade on iPhone 7 will support faster charging

Narada Desk | August 26, 2016 3:18 pm Print
The only explanation about this is cutting costs (which would be ridiculous in such a cheap component when compared with the device), and the fact that the iPad does consume to 2.1A, whilst the iPhone up to the 5S consume only up to 1.8A. Maybe Apple doesn't want to create a third model. Maybe there are too many chargers in stock. Maybe the iPad charger is too bulky (cubic) to fit the iPhone box. Maybe Apple assumed that charging from 20% in less than one hour is enough

Twitter user @The_Malignant, suggests the iPhone 7 (and, theoretically, the iPhone 7 Plus) could feature support for faster charging speeds. Specifically, the tweet says the iPhone 7 will feature support for “at least five volt two amp charging.”

Normally, If you use the standard 5v iPhone charger, 5 or 6 hours. The 10v iPad charger will do it in perhaps 3, and the new 12.5 iPad Pro charger can do it in less than 2. Assuming you’ve dropped the iPhone down below 20%.

Of course, if you just need a quick charge to last through the evening hours, and won’t be using it heavily, charging it for a couple of hrs with the 5v will take it to a respectable 40–50%. A partial charge doesn’t affect the battery life or capacity. the bigger iPad chargers will give you 90% in 45 minutes or so, but looks are deceiving, while it looks like 90%, the charge doesn’t last as long as you might think.

The iPhone 6 Plus has a 2915mAh battery. If your charger can provide 1A, it will take 2.915 hours. If you have the 2A iPad charger (or equivalent), it will take 1.475 hours.

Now in practice it’s never like that, but always some more minutes.

The final 10% charge is slower than the initial charge (but not the 10 hours trickle charge like other answer mentions, that’s no longer relevant for a lot of newer battery technologies). If it says 100%, it’s probably 99 or 98, but you won’t notice the difference.

The final 10% charge is slower than the initial charge (but not the 10 hours trickle charge like other answer mentions, that’s no longer relevant for a lot of newer battery technologies). If it says 100%, it’s probably 99 or 98, but you won’t notice the difference.

The device will consume from the battery at the same time the battery is being charged, so the more the device consumes, the slower the battery charges. Setting the device to airplane will speed up the charging (getting nearer the theoretical value), not because it disables the mobile and wifi signals (those are not that significant), but because when the device has no network at all, all 3rd party apps and special all system services will fully stop. It’s those apps waking the CPU that consumes the battery, not the radio.

And of course there’s always energy lost all over the place, so the more the stuff heats, the less effective the charging is.

The questions about iPhone charging options was Why wouldn’t the iPhone come with a 12W charger since it charges faster?

The only explanation about this is cutting costs (which would be ridiculous in such a cheap component when compared with the device), and the fact that the iPad does consume to 2.1A, whilst the iPhone up to the 5S consume only up to 1.8A. Maybe Apple doesn’t want to create a third model. Maybe there are too many chargers in stock. Maybe the iPad charger is too bulky (cubic) to fit the iPhone box. Maybe Apple assumed that charging from 20% in less than one hour is enough.

Loading...