Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

James Jimmy O’Neill becomes New York City police commissioner

Narada Desk | August 3, 2016 8:13 pm Print
James "Jimmy" O'Neill will be the next New York City police commissioner. He will replace popular outgoing Commissioner William Bratton.
New NYPD Commissioner at press conference.

James “Jimmy” O’Neill will take charge as the next New York City police commissioner. He announced the decision during a press conference today. He will be replacing the outgoing Commissioner William Bratton, popular for bringing down the crime rates in the city.

William Bratton is expected to join private sector, it is reported. James O’Neill said, he wants to focus on strengthening the police’s relations with local communities.

He said, he wanted the local patrol officers to familiarize with people on their respective beats. “Officers should know them by their first names,”added the new commissioner.

Introducing O’Neill today at the City Hall, Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio revealed his primary duty involves executing a “neighborhood policing plan”.

He is also expected to sort out the differences that had surfaced between the blacks and police in recent years.

The department has faced critical crisis like the death of Eric Garner, leading to the killing of two NYPD officers in recent times.

O’Neill, had a long stint with NYPD and is known at the national level as an expert cop. He reiterated his position on good policing, adding that they should learn “how to talk to every type of person imaginable.”

He underlined more interaction within the rank and file of the police force and said, “Knowing who your police officers are, especially what their names are,” he said, “is one way to strengthen the bonds that exist in many places and bridge the divide where it doesn’t.”

However, activists have urged the police to take immediate measures adding that so far the departments neighborhood policing didn’t yield any results.

“Having more officers in the neighborhood and having people know each others’ names has nothing to do with whether people are going to be held accountable for brutality,” an activist was quoted as saying to