Friday, September 9th, 2016

As govt mulls S. Kashmir handover to Army, Dalbir Singh Suhag visits state

Narada Desk | September 9, 2016 3:24 pm Print
The Army chief visited Defence formations in the north and south of the Valley to get inputs from the officers who are overseeing the prevailing tense situation

Dalbir Singh Suhag : Indian army chief

To take first-hand report of the ground situation in troubled-torn Jammu and Kashmir, Army chief General Dalbir Singh Suhag on Friday reviewed the security situation. The areas in focus are the four worst-affected districts in south Kashmir.

Gen Suhag arrived at the state in the morning and was briefed about the prevailing situation in the Valley by General Officer Commanding of Chinar Corps Lt Gen Satish Dua, defence sources said.

The sources said the Army chief visited Defence formations in the north and south of the Valley to get inputs from the officers who are overseeing the prevailing tense situation.

“The Army chief was informed of steps to be taken to help the civil administration restore normalcy, particularly in south Kashmir,” the sources said.

Gen Singh also visited the forward locations along the Line of Control in Kupwara district to review the preparedness of the anti-infiltration grid, they said. He will call on Jammu and Kashmir Governor NN Vohra later before heading back to Delhi.

The Army chief was also  briefed on the new military methods being planned to curb Pakistan-sponsored infiltration into Jammu and Kashmir. This comes in the backdrop of the government thinking to hand over the south Kashmir region to the Army for action against militants. The street protests have been vociferous in south Kashmir – Kulgam, Pulwama, Anantnag and Shopian among other places.

General Suhag had also met Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh. The government is seeing this as a major challenge to restore law and order that has broken down completely in the absence of any presence of the J&K Police or the paramilitary forces in the rural hinterland.

Police stations and CRPF camps have been deserted and mobs of angry youth now control the streets. The Army may not be tasked with mob control, but is with tasked with tracking down armed militants who have been fanning trouble.

(Agencies)

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