Monday, September 19th, 2016

Watch video of how iPhone7 handles knife scratch test, bend test and durability test

Narada Desk | September 19, 2016 3:07 pm Print
JerryRigEverything ,who regularly carries out torture tests on smartphones, has got his hands on a new iPhone 7 and subjected it to a series of highly destructive tests, including a bend test (which the iPhone 7 seems to survive better than the iPhone 6), a burn test (the screen appears to recover well from high heat), and a scratch test.

Apple doesn’t have the same footnote for its simply “black” color. It comes in a matte finish and might be more on the gray side, but I think it’s the color we have to go with to avoid scratches. Embrace the black iPhone 7; it’s what we the people wanted!

The high-gloss finish of the jet black iPhone 7 is achieved through a precision nine-step anodization and polishing process. Its surface is equally as hard as other anodized Apple products; however, its high shine may show fine micro-abrasions with use. If you are concerned about this, we suggest you use one of the many cases available to protect your iPhone.”

People couldn’t wait to get their hands on the iPhone 7 just to scratch it, drop it, and attempt to bend it. Sounds like the perfect thing to do with a new phone! On the channel JerryRigEverything, the team tested the new iPhone for scratch and bend resistance. The back of the phone, the screen, the home button, and camera lens resisted scratches from both coins and keys. Great!

But the phone did scratch from a razor blade, even though Apple says its home button and camera are coated with sapphire crystal.

JerryRigEverything ,who regularly carries out torture tests on smartphones, has got his hands on a new iPhone 7 and subjected it to a series of highly destructive tests, including a bend test (which the iPhone 7 seems to survive better than the iPhone 6), a burn test (the screen appears to recover well from high heat), and a scratch test.

And it’s the scratch test that raises a durability concern.

Like last year’s iPhone 6s, the new handset is constructed from 7000 series aluminum, making it nigh unbendable for regular humans. During the bend test, the channel pointed out what it calls “waterproofing adhesive,” which appeared to stretch out from the edge of display when it lifted away from the aluminum chassis. Apple is touting IP67 water resistance, but whether the sticky material is indeed a waterproofing agent or simply Apple’s usual liquid-based adhesive is unclear.

 

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