Thursday, September 29th, 2016

World Heart Day 2016- find out the major myths about heart

Rajkumari Tankha | September 29, 2016 4:24 pm Print
“Diabetes is a major risk factor for heart. To keep diabetes at bay one must keep obesity at bay and to do so one must eat healthy,” says Dr Panwar. “For a healthy heart, you must keep blood sugar level under check which in turn means that you should maintain normal body weight. And this can be done only by eating foods that give you enough energy, are metablised faster and don’t make you lethargic,” he adds.

World Heart Day

The theme of world Heart Day 2016 is Creating Heart Healthy Environment, and when we talk of environment, we are not just talking about the outside physical environment we live in but the internal environment of our body as well.

So this World Heart Day, we bust two major myths associated with the health of heart. And helping us do this is noted Cardiac Surgeon Dr Sunil Panwar who set up Ganga Amrit Multi-speciality Hospital at Muzzafarnagar in UP after his decade-long stint in US.

“Diabetes is a major risk factor for heart. To keep diabetes at bay one must keep obesity at bay and to do so one must eat healthy,” says Dr Panwar. “For a healthy heart, you must keep blood sugar level under check which in turn means that you should maintain normal body weight. And this can be done only by eating foods that give you enough energy, are metablised faster and don’t make you lethargic,” he adds.

“Basically we have to put in practice this reverse methodology to keep the heart healthy,” informs Dr Panwar, who has treated hundreds of patients so far. “An obese person has to be first given a healthy diet so as to bring down his weight before he can begin his/her exercise regimen. Otherwise exercise will do no good,” informs Dr Panwar.

Myth 1
Rice is fattening, wheat is not.

Fact
Rice doesn’t lead to obesity, wheat does. So remove wheat from your diet. Consuming a wheat-free diet causes blood sugar levels to drop, from as high as 400 to 150. To those who find it difficult to believe in this, Dr Panwar advises a five-day wheat-free diet to check out its efficacy.
Dr Panwar himself has been off-wheat for the last 23 years.

“If you notice, North-Indians have bulky bodies while people from South India, Bihar and Bengal have comparatively leaner bodies. This is basically because North-Indians have wheat as their staple diet while the others are primarily rice-eaters,” he says.

Myth 2
Certain fruits like banana, cheeku and mango cause the blood sugar to rise.

Fact
There is no truth in this. Fruits are the best suppliers of sugar to the body. All fruits contain fructose which is metabolized directly into blood, unlike glucose which needs insulin to break down into simpler ingredients so that it could be absorbed by blood. But one must eat one fruit at a time for it to digest properly.

“One must eat lots of fruits, and all fruits. Only thing which is to be kept in mind is that only one fruit should be eaten at a time. One must not eat fruit salads as these are unhealthy. Biochemically, different foods undergo different kind of chemical reactions, so is the case with fruits, and when eaten together, these reactions interfere with each other,” say Dr Panwar.

Dr Panwar states that the way we eat our food is equally important. The old saying of chewing each bite at least 32 times has a lot of wisdom in it.
“One should spend at least half-an-hour in eating any meal. Have you noticed almost all institutions and offices keep a 30-minute lunch break. That is because this much time is needed to eat the food properly so that it gets digested and benefits our body,” says Dr Panwar. “Normally people chew just a couple of times and swallow. A lot of food remains undigested in this manner,” he adds.

Rajkumari Tankha
Rajkumari Tankha
The writer is a Delhi-based journalist. She has previously worked for Ministry of I & B (Govt of India), Hindustan Times and Special Audience Publications.
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