Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

Ecuador cuts Julian Assange’s internet access over ‘interference with US election’

Narada Desk | October 19, 2016 7:11 pm Print
The restriction comes after WikiLeaks recently published hacked materials linked to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton

Ecuador has reportedly restricted internet access for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange at its embassy in London over his alleged interference in the US election.

The restriction comes after WikiLeaks recently published hacked materials linked to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. The group had also released some controversial mails of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) earlier.

An official statement said the government had restricted the internet access available to Assange because “in recent weeks, WikiLeaks has published a wealth of documents, impacting on the US election campaign,” media reports revealed.

The statement read as: “In that respect, Ecuador, exercising its sovereign right, has temporarily restricted access to part of its communications systems in its UK Embassy.”

“(Ecuador) respects the principle of non-intervention in the internal affairs of other states,” it added.

WikiLeaks earlier said that Ecuador had cut off Assange’s internet access on Saturday evening after the publication of sensitive information.

However, the US denied WikiLeaks claims that the country had asked Ecuador to stop the group publishing documents that could make impacts on election, BBC News reported.

The statement also added that “Ecuador does not yield to pressures from other countries”.

Julian Assange has sought asylum at Ecuador’s London’s embassy since 2012 and is wanted for questioning in Sweden over sexual assault allegations, which he denied. The Australian political activist says he would be transferred to the US to face potential espionage charges over WikiLeaks’ publishing activities.

The mails leaked earlier claimed that Hillary Clinton told a Goldman Sachs conference that she would like to intervene secretly in Syria, when giving answer to a question from Lloyd Blankfein, the bank’s chief executive.

“My view was you intervene as covertly as is possible for Americans to intervene,” Ms Clinton told employees of the bank, BBC News reported.

Loading...