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Republican camp a divided house, McCain withdraws support, Pence sticks to Trump

GOP former presidential nominee Senator Mc Cain is one of those prominent leaders, who openly come out against him, while some others including Trump's vice-president candidate Mike Pence, have decided to back him.

Enraged over Republican party nominee Donald Trump’s sexist and indecent comments on women that he had made in 2005, many Republican leaders have withdrawn endorsements for them.
GOP presidential nominee Senator Mc Cain is one of those prominent leaders, who openly come out against him, while some others including Trump’s vice-president candidate Mike Pence, have decided to back him.

McCain on Friday said he is withdrawing his support for Trump, adding that he should now “suffer the consequences” for his sexist remarks.

“I have wanted to support the candidate our party nominated. He was not my choice, but as a past nominee, I thought it important I respect the fact that Donald Trump won a majority of the delegates by the rules our party set. I thought I owed his supporters that deference,” McCain added.

He further said, “But Donald Trump’s behavior this week, concluding with the disclosure of his demeaning comments about women and his boasts about sexual assaults, make it impossible to continue to offer even conditional support for his candidacy.”

McCain and his wife, Cindy, now vote neither for Trump nor for Hillary Clinton, he told media.
VP nominee, Pence told media he does not “condone” Trump’s comments, at the same time “cannot defend them” but is “grateful that he has expressed remorse and apologized.”

Republican party is a divided camp now on how to tackle the personal and business allegations against their presidential candidate.
Some leaders are of the view to dump Trump and field his running mate Pence, as the last step to save the party from a disaster in the general election.

However, a recent poll among the strong GOP voters revealed that rank-and-file of Republicans still back Trump, despite the leaders leaving the camp in large numbers.
The poll say, fewer than four-in-10 voters (ie, 39 % GOP members feel that Trump should quit his race for presidential campaigns, while a strong 45 percent, still back him and say he should not leave the race.

However, the number of leaders leaving the maverick candidate is increasing every day.

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