Friday, November 18th, 2016

Supreme Court says we will have riots over demonetisation; refuses stay on hearings elsewhere in the country

Narada Desk | November 18, 2016 1:48 pm Print
Supreme Court had also earlier refused to intervene with the government's decision, but had asked to see a plan on how the lines at banks and other inconveniences will be urgently mitigated.

As the Supreme Court heard the ongoing petitions against demonetisation , Chief Justice of India T S Thakur has now questioned the Centre on its steps and remarked: “We will have riots on the streets.”

CJI Thakur said, “There are difficulties and the problem is serious, Centre can’t dispute.” He added, “The last time you said you are working out relief but you have reduced the withdrawal amount to 2,000. What’s the problem? Is it printing problem?”

“”You have scrapped 500 and 1,000, but what happened to the 100 rupee note? Is there shortage of even Rs 100 notes,” the SC bench asked on reduction of exchange limit. Within hours of the SC observation, many parts of Central Delhi were stuck in a traffic lockdown after high-level VIP movement began among the government to defuse the situation.

In response to the SC, Attorney General Mukul Rohatgi said, “Not only printing… it has to be transported to lakhs of branches across the country and ATMs have to re-calibrated. We have given relief to farmers, wedding and small traders.”

On the petition of new currency note of Rs 2000 bleeding colour when it’s wet, he adviced attorney M L Sharma “Well, don’t put notes in water.”

However, the apex court expressed its reservation on the Centre’s plea for direction that no other court should hear pleas on the demonetisation notification, allowing the lower courts to admit petitions against the November 8 order. It said, “People are facing real problems and we cannot shut them from moving courts to register their grievances.”

Calcutta High Court has asked for the report from Centre on demonetisation, whereas Madras High Court had earlier rejected the Public Interest Litigation filed.

Supreme Court had also earlier refused to intervene with the government’s decision, but had asked to see a plan on how the lines at banks and other inconveniences will be urgently mitigated.

 

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