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Demonetisation: Kashmiris unperturbed by turmoil all around

“The skilled and unskilled workers mostly earn as much as they spend on an average. Big industrialists and businessmen never keep large amounts of cash at home in the conflict-ridden area. That is the reason why the demonetisation has had little impact in Kashmir,” Maryam added.

Demonetisation : Jammu and Kashmir

Demonetisation showed its minimum inconvenience in the Kashmir Valley where the November 8 surprise policy to demonetise the high denomination notes had caused little or no effect because businesses and other activities were closed since mid-July.

While rest of the country remains in panic, Kashmiri people were struggling for their existence.

“No common Kashmiri keeps large amounts of cash at home because of the disturbed situation,” said Elizabeth Maryam, Economics professor at Kashmir University.

“The salaried class gets monthly wages through bank accounts and them usual space withdrawals to suit daily needs.”

“The skilled and unskilled workers mostly earn as much as they spend on an average. Big industrialists and businessmen never keep large amounts of cash at home in the conflict-ridden area. That is the reason why the demonetisation has had little impact in Kashmir,” Maryam added.

Muzaffar Ahmad, a college principal, said: “In a place where the protest shutdown has paralysed life for over four months, who would shoot up their blood pressure further over cash crunch?”

Earlier defence minister Manohar Parrikar claimed that demonetisation had reduced the stone pelting and militancy in the valley. People have questioned these arguments with their strong dissent.

“Do you want us to believe that a youth is ready to be killed with a bullet or be blinded with a pellet because the separatists give him a 500 rupees note? That is absurd,” said Zahoor Ahmad who is working as a contractor.

But officials who are working as the part of the system believe that use of fake notes is the part of ongoing protests.

While on Saturday, Kashmir valley showed the symptoms that valley resuming into normal life after 133 days of shutting down.  A large number of people and vehicles out on the roads, and markets, schools, offices and businesses open for the first time in the last over four months of shutdown and protests.

 

 

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