Saturday, November 12th, 2016

Maharashtra collects Rs 217 crore as people pay pending bills, taxes in old currency

Narada Desk | November 12, 2016 4:24 pm Print
The government on Friday has extended use of Rs 500 and Rs 100 notes for paying household utility bills, fuel, taxes and fees as well as purchases from co-operative stores by another 72 hours to 14 November.
RS 500 note

As people finding ways to get rid of their old Rs 500 and Rs 1000 notes, Maharashtra government on Friday received a whopping Rs 217-crore in one day as citizens thronged to pay civic bills and taxes in old currency.

The state government collected Rs 82 crores within eight hours in old Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes against payments by citizens to respective local bodies towards pending bills of various civic services and taxes. By night the collection touched Rs 217 crore mark.

The government on Friday has extended use of Rs 500 and Rs 100 notes for paying household utility bills, fuel, taxes and fees as well as purchases from co-operative stores by another 72 hours to 14 November.

Urban development department in the state has appealed the citizens to clear their dues. The deadline extension will ease the burden of citizens in depositing old currency with banks amid ongoing rush to exchange notes, said the government.

The state power supplier, and BEST announced that they will continue accepting old Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes against bills for the next three days.

BEST witnessed a 53% rise in bus pass sales in two days – from Rs 40.7 lakh on Wednesday to Rs 62.6 lakh on Friday as citizens rushed to make or renew monthly and quarterly passes using the old Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 banknotes.

Earlier the government had allowed use of the old currency at government hospitals, railway ticketing, public transport, airline ticketing at airports, milk booths, crematoria/burial grounds and petrol pumps for 72 hours. Later the list was expanded to include payments for metro rail tickets, highway and road toll, purchase of medicines on doctor prescription from the government and private pharmacies, LPG gas cylinders, railway catering, electricity and water bills and ASI monument entry tickets.

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