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PM Modi to meet Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe today

India and Japan are also expected to sign a civil nuclear cooperation agreement that will enable United States-based atomic firms Westinghouse Electric Corporation and GE Energy to set up plants in India

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be meeting Japanese premiere Shinzo Abe today. The two countries are expected to sign a civil nuclear deal which will facilitate leading US-based atomic companies to set up plants in India, besides discussing ways to step up cooperation in the areas like trade, investment and security.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Thursday left for Japan on his second visit to the country as prime minister. He had previously also visited Japan as the Cheif Minister of Gujarat. “Reached Japan. Looking forward to fruitful deliberations that will boost economic and cultural ties between India and Japan,” he tweeted.

At the meeting, Modi and Abe will discuss ways to enhance ties in a broad range of areas, including security, trade and investment, skill development and infrastructure development. India and Japan will be signing as many as 10 deals, including the civil nuclear deal. Japan will also ask India to reiterate its unilateral moratorium commitment.

India and Japan are also expected to sign a civil nuclear cooperation agreement that will enable United States-based atomic firms Westinghouse Electric Corporation and GE Energy to set up plants in India, NDTV reported.

A Japanese official told The Indian Express that terrorism wasn’t on Japan’s radar until seven Japanese people, including a pregnant woman, died during the Dhaka Holey Artisan Bakery attack.

“This made the common people and the government in Japan much more sensitive to the menace of terrorism, which was so far a sort of remote concept,” the official said.

The bilateral statement will mention terror attacks, but Japan is unwilling to mention Uri and Pathankot attacks explicitly, an Indian official said. However, officials said that the India-Japan statement could have mentions of terrorism in the “strongest language.”

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