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South Korea refuses Google access to official mapping data

South Korea has rejected a request by US tech giant Google to use the official maps of the country, explaining concerns over national security with neighbouring North Korea.

South Korea has rejected a request by  US tech giant Google to use the official maps of the country, explaining concerns over national security with neighbouring North Korea.

The company stated that the decision based on the National Security Law, established in 1947, which plotted strict restrictions to protect the country from North Koerns, from Land ministry was disappointing.

“We’re disappointed by this decision. We’ve always taken security concerns very seriously and will continue to provide useful map services in compliance with Korea’s current map data export regulation,”  said Taj Meadows, a Google spokesperson.

Google will be offering its services without having the access to use government mapping data due to security reasons over the ongoing conflict between South and North Korea, said the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport.

South Korea has been facing a division over the issue since Google filed its request in June.

Some government ministries which were trying to promote tourism and local firms’ overseas businesses, extended their support to Google. The biggest inconvenience is the lack of an online mapping service with navigation and directions in foreign languages.

 

 

 

 

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