23 killed in suicide car bomb attack in Iraq

Earlier four Iraqi aid workers and at least seven civilians were killed by random mortar fire as they queued to receive aid in two separate incidents in eastern Mosul, the United Nations said

23 killed in suicide car bomb attack in Iraq

A triple car bombing on Thursday killed at least 23 people in an eastern area of Mosul recently retaken from the Islamic State group by the Iraqi army, BBC reported. Islamic State claimed three suicide car bombs that killed at least 15 civilians and eight Iraqi policemen.

The attacks targeted Kokjali, a suburb that the authorities said they had retaken from the jihadists almost two months ago. "A terrorist attack in the form of three car bombs at a market in Gogjali killed 15 civilians and eight police," a coordination centre for forces battling IS said in a statement reported by AFP.


Earlier four Iraqi aid workers and at least seven civilians were killed by random mortar fire as they queued to receive aid in two separate incidents in eastern Mosul, the United Nations said.

"According to initial reports, four aid workers and at least seven civilians queueing for emergency assistance in eastern Mosul city have been killed by indiscriminate mortar fire," Lise Grande, UN humanitarian coordinator in Iraq, said in a statement.

The Iraqi military did not say whether the explosions were caused by suicide attackers. But IS said three militants had blown themselves up, killing at least 20 "apostates" and destroying several army vehicles, BBC reported.
 The U.S.-backed assault on Mosul, the last major stronghold of IS in Iraq was launched by a 50,000-strong alliance of  Iraqi security forces personnel, Kurdish Peshmerga fighters, Sunni Arab tribesmen and Shia militiamen. It has become the biggest military operation in Iraq since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein.