What is Eid al-Fitr?

On the day of Eid, Muslims gather at mosques in the morning to perform the Eid prayer, before holding family gatherings and visiting friends.

What is Eid al-Fitr?

The Eid al-Fitr festival is celebrated by Muslims around the world, marking the end of holy month of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting. Eid al-Fitr in Arabic literally means "festival of breaking the fast".

Because the timing of Eid al-Fitr is based on the Islamic lunar calendar, it can be difficult to predict when the festival will take place.

On the day of Eid, Muslims gather at mosques in the morning to perform the Eid prayer, before holding family gatherings and visiting friends.


Muslims share feasts and sweets to mark the end of the fasting period, and greet each other by saying "Eid Mubarak" - which roughly translates as "happy Eid" or "blessed Eid."

Eid is the first and only day in the month of Shawwal during which Muslims are not permitted to fast. The holiday celebrates the conclusion of the 29 or 30 days of dawn-to-sunset fasting during the entire month of Ramadan.

The beginning of the Eid can only be confirmed based on sightings of the new moon every year, as per Muslim tradition.

For 2016, the Fiqh Council of North America (FCNA) had observed the Eid al-Fitr on July 6, based on astronomical predictions.

The charity groups in Canada and the United Kingdom, the Islamic Relief Canada and Islamic Relief UK, also predicted the Eid on July 6.

In the UK, the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan hosted an Eid food festival in Trafalgar Square on Saturday July 9.

Bangladesh and the UAE had announced a nine-day public holiday, effectively starting from July 1.