Experts say no need of additional protein, regular food contains adequate protein

Anna Daniels, a dietitian and British Dietetic Association spokeswoman said that people have a misconception they do need more protein whereas actually the majority of us are getting adequate protein from regular food

Experts say no need of additional protein, regular food contains adequate protein

As we all set to enter into 2017, one of the New Year’s resolutions we have been seeing all around is the suggestion to keep a tab on your food habit in the coming year. Lengthy articles on bad/good habits and in-short health tips, among others, are all doing the rounds. And, obviously, protein is the most mentioned term in all of these.

In the recent past, the demand for high-protein products has gone up due to the increase in number of customers opting for such products. The health and fitness sections in stores have filled with enhanced protein versions produced by brands including Weetabix, Shreddies, Mars and Snickers etc.


But, experts suggest all these run for high-protein products makes customers fall victim to clever marketing.

Anna Daniels, a dietitian and British Dietetic Association spokeswoman said that people have a misconception they do need more protein whereas actually the majority of us are getting adequate protein from regular food, The Guardian reported.

“If you’re an athlete you will have higher requirements but you can still get it from eggs, yoghurt, meat. The majority of us who go to the gym for an hour a couple of times a week, there’s no need to be having additional protein we [already] get from a balanced healthy diet,” Anna Daniels was quoted by the newspaper saying.

The data from sports protein products market also support experts’ arguments. The Euromonitor, which offers strategy research for consumer markets, said the sports nutrition market has grown by about 160% since 2011. According to another market watch, Nielsen, there was a 63% increase in sales of protein bars in 2015, compared with the data of previous year.

Tom Sanders, professor emeritus of nutrition and dietetics at King’s College London, suggests all these hype about protein products is aimed to sell a cheap product at a high price, The Guardian said.

“There’s been a lot of hype in gyms pushing high-protein shakes, there’s also a need to get rid of a waste product from the dairy industry, which is whey protein,” he said.