Heart of Asia Conference: India, Afghanistan corner Pakistan on terrorism, Aziz says "blame games" won't help peace

At the inauguration of conference, Prime Minister Modi didn't name Pakistan but said terrorism and externally induced instability posed the gravest threat to Afghanistan's peace, stability and prosperity.

Heart of Asia Conference: India, Afghanistan corner Pakistan on terrorism, Aziz says "blame games" won

At the Heart of Asia Conference which came to an end in Amritsar last night, terrorism emanating from Pakistan remained main focus area for Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Afghan president Ashraf Ghani. Sartaz Aziz, Pakistan prime minister's adviser on foreign affairs with continuous attacks said back home that blame games won't help to bring peace in Pakistan, and claimed that his presence was Pakistan's testimony for Afghanistan support.

"Pakistan has generously pledged $500 million for reconstruction of Afghanistan. This fund, Mr Aziz, could very well be used for containing extremism because without peace, any amount of assistance will not meet the needs of our people,'' Ghani said, directly addressing Sartaj Aziz.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, whose country's proposal for a framework to effectively deal with terrorism could not be adopted by the conference, made a stinging attack on Pakistan, accusing it of launching an "undeclared war" against his country by providing support and safe sanctuaries to terror groups including Taliban. He added that if the Taliban did not have sanctuary in Pakistan, they would not last even for a month.

Back home to Pakistan, Aziz responded to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s allegations that Pakistan was giving “sanctuary” to terrorists, and said concerted policy and action, not blame games, are needed to establish peace in Afghanistan. Such blame games will not bring peace to Afghanistan, he said. Condemning Ashraf Ghani’s statement, he said that the security situation in Afghanistan was tense, adding that Pakistan will not allow its land to be used against anyone.

At the inauguration of conference, Prime Minister Modi didn't name Pakistan but said terrorism and externally induced instability posed the gravest threat to Afghanistan's peace, stability and prosperity.

He asked for resolute action against those who sheltered and financed terrorists. According to Modi, the growing arc of terrorist violence endangered the entire region and, as such, support for voices of peace in Afghanistan alone were not enough. He said silence and inaction against terrorism not just in Afghanistan but the entire region would only embolden terrorists and their masters.
Ahead of the conference, Modi and Ghani also had a bilateral meeting in which they reviewed the progress on recent decisions to deepen bilateral economic cooperation and strengthen the strategic partnership between the two nations.