The Assassin’s Creed movie review: Michael Fassbender flick is a stupendously pretentious film version of the game

Assassin�s Creed just feels like every other OK action movie, propped up by a superficial connection to the video game series.

The Assassin’s Creed movie review: Michael Fassbender flick is a stupendously pretentious film version of the game

The game Assassin’s Creed is quite popular among the young folks all over the world and that might be one of the reasons why Justin Kurzel wanted to make a movie on this Ubisoft gaming phenomenon.

Assassin’s Creed should have been a fun movie. In the games, we’ve seen the Revolutionary War, we’ve been a wise-cracking pirate, we’ve had a boss battle with the pope. Unfortunately what we get is a stupendously pretentious film version, starring Michael Fassbender (also producer) and Marion Cotillard.


The convicted killer played by Fassbender, Cal Lynch by name, is new to this universe. Just as he's about to be executed in prison, he's whisked off to a schmaltzy super secret overseas laboratory run by Jeremy Irons and Cotillard, playing brilliant and driven and vaguely bored father and daughter.

Fassbender is a pro cosplayer, and the action won’t put you to sleep, but Assassin’s Creed fails to bring any interesting new ideas to Ubisoft’s wide open fictional pasture.

For anyone who's played an Assassin’s Creed game starring Desmond, the premise will feel familiar.

Assassin’s Creed is essentially two films that bleed into each other. One is a sci-fi story in which Callum is imprisoned in the grey halls of the Templar pharmaceutical company, Abstergo. The other is a rollicking adventure smack dab in the middle of the Spanish Inquisition.

By the end, Assassin’s Creed just feels like every other OK action movie, propped up by a superficial connection to the video game series.