US military veterans build barracks for Dakota pipeline protesters amid bitter winter

U.S. military veterans are building barracks to support thousands of activists who have squared off against authorities to oppose the multibillion-dollar Dakota Access Pipeline project near a Native American reservation.

US military veterans build barracks for Dakota pipeline protesters amid bitter winter

U.S. military veterans are building barracks to support thousands of activists who have squared off against authorities to oppose the multibillion-dollar Dakota Access Pipeline project  near a Native American reservation.

Veterans have started arriving at Cannon Ball, a small town, near Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota pledging to be a human shield against aggressors within the law enforcement community acting at the behest of the company building the DAPL.

Temperatures in Cannon Ball are expected to fall to just 4 degrees Fahrenheit (-16 Celsius) by the middle of next week.


About 2,100 veterans who signed up on the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock group's Facebook page are at the camp, with hundreds more expected during the weekend. Tribal leaders asked the veterans, who aim to form a wall in front of police to protect the protesters, to avoid confrontation with authorities and not get arrested themselves.


The Native Americans and other protesters say the $3.8 billion pipeline threatens water resources and sacred tribal sites.