BJP workers wave placards, raise slogans against Amit Shah at party headquarters

BJP workers on Wednesday rocked the party headquarters on Ashoka Road waving placards and raising slogans against senior leaders, including party chief Amit Shah for accommodating �outsiders� in the candidates� list for Uttar Pradesh polls.

BJP workers wave placards, raise slogans against Amit Shah at party headquarters

BJP workers on Wednesday rocked the party headquarters on Ashoka Road waving placards and raising slogans against senior leaders, including party chief Amit Shah for accommodating “outsiders” in the candidates’ list for Uttar Pradesh polls.

The BJP’s first list of candidates with 149 names was released Monday. While scores of workers raised slogans inside the party office compound against the leadership’s decision to field “turncoats”, a larger crowd protested outside, reported The Indian Express.


BJP workers from Gautam Budh Nagar district gathered there and raised slogans such as “Amit Shah Murdabad”, “Stop giving tickets to outsiders” and “Respect old workers”. They waved placards that read, “Stop lying in the name of surveys” and “Stop humiliating senior workers while honouring outsiders”.

The protesters were particularly angry with Union Minister Mahesh Sharma, the MP from Noida. One placard read: “Mahesh Sharma should stop capturing the party by immoral ways.”

Slogans were also raised against Om Mathur, BJP general secretary in-charge of Uttar Pradesh.

One worker was heard shouting that the party used them to organise crowd for public rallies, but ignored them during selection of candidates.


Protests against the fielding of new entrants to the party were also held in several parts of Uttar Pradesh. At many places, BJP workers burned the party flag and effigies of senior leaders.

Party leaders played down the protests, saying such incidents were “quite natural” in the run-up to the elections. They argued that the party, which has been out of power in Uttar Pradesh for three terms, had to field established leaders from other parties to ensure victory in the politically crucial state.