Brexit: UK PM Theresa May says Britain will leave single market

Theresa May warned that the EU will be torn into tiny pieces if it does not become more flexible

Brexit: UK PM Theresa May says Britain will leave single market

After months of uncertainty about UK’s Brexit plans, the British Prime Minister Theresa May on Tuesday said that the UK will leave the European Union single market and will not remain a full member of the customs union after the exit from EU.

Announcing that Parliament would get to vote on the final deal on Brexit, May promised to push for the "freest possible trade" with European countries and also to engage in new deals with others across the world.



"This agreement should allow for the freest possible trade in goods and services between Britain and the EU's member states,” PM was quoted by BBC News as saying.

"It should give British companies the maximum possible freedom to trade with and operate within European markets and let European businesses do the same in Britain. But I want to be clear: what I am proposing cannot mean membership of the single market," she added.

Theresa May warned that the EU will be torn into tiny pieces if it does not become more flexible and added that she will walk away from negotiations with Brussels if they attempt to give Britain a “bad deal,” the Telegraph reported.





Earlier, throwing the Brexit process into uncertainty, the UK High Court had ruled that the Briton’s exit from the European Union won’t be possible without parliament approval.

The order stated that the parliament must vote on whether the country can start the process of leaving the EU. Nearly 52 percent of voters in the country had approved the decision to leave EU in a June referendum. With this order, Theresa May’s government does not have the authority to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty to begin the formal exit negotiations with the EU.



Days after the UK High court’s rule over Brexit, British Prime Minister Theresa May had said the Parliament should accept the referendum to leave the European Union.

Writing in the Sunday Telegraph newspaper, May said that she is confident of overturning the court ruling that will delay the process.

She wrote: “The people made their choice, and did so decisively. It is the responsibility of the government to get on with the job and to carry out their instruction in full.”