Irada: A relevant flick which lost the pace for a thriller

Irada visibly not taking the form of a documentary thus narrates the story of Parabjeet Singh portrayed by Naseeruddin Shah who is master planner whose daughter is diagnosed with deadly cancer

Irada: A relevant flick which lost the pace for a thriller

Irada, a film of immense questions about development from director Arpanaa Singh brings harsh realities from Punjab.

Hundreds of cancer cases are reported from a specific geographic area of the state which was once known as the rice bowl of India, and Irada suggests that the reason behind might be reverse-boring, a technical term for dumping chemical wastes into the soil.

Irada visibly not taking the form of a documentary thus narrates the story of Parabjeet Singh portrayed by Naseeruddin Shah who is master planner whose daughter is diagnosed with deadly cancer. The political administration headed by chief minister Ramandeep Braitch (Divya Dutta), acts like a proverbial ostrich in the sand and is only concerned about the donations it gets from the pharmaceutical mafia.


The nexus between all these authorities becomes clear when a National Investigation (NIA) officer Arjun Mishra (Arshad Warsi) who comes to Punjab to investigate a complicated murder case.

Disguised as a common man's fight for justice, Irada talks about systematic corruption or rather the willpower's lack to curb it. Divay Dutta portrayal of the autocratic CM really steals the show and symbolises political parasites, who want to retain power by hook or crook.

The performance of Sharad Kelkar as Paddy Sharma as a privileged pharmaceutical executive is highly assistive towards Divya's portrayal. People like him are contaminated the local water. He challeneges the CM to take action against him and hows how democratically elected leaders are helpless with donors who have deep pockets.

Constructed on the paths of A Wednesday, Irada tries to make up pace of a thriller but fails to sustain the initial momentum as many sub-stories cross paths. The film strives to give every story a fair chance to unfold but loses the tight grip on the central theme.