Louvre attack leaves Paris fearing new blow to tourism

Friday�s knife attack on soldiers at the Louvre museum in Paris was the first "terrorist attack" at a tourist landmark in the French capital, which likely to take a toll on the tourism industry.

Louvre attack leaves Paris fearing new blow to tourism

Friday’s knife attack on soldiers at the Louvre museum in Paris was the first "terrorist attack" at a tourist landmark in the French capital, which likely to take a toll on the tourism industry.

French authorities say they believe the man who tried to attack the Louvre museum was a 29-year-old Egyptian man. The attack marked another stage in the recent wave of terror attacks to hit Paris and France.


There have been numerous other warnings and plots, including one to attack Disneyland Paris.

While the government and Paris city chiefs insist the foiled attack shows their security operation works well, the images of soldiers surrounding the attacker on a staircase leading to the Louvre museum, one of the most famous attractions in the world, will do little to reassure potential visitors.

Visitor numbers have already been shrinking since the devastating attacks on the capital's bars and the Bataclan music venue in November 2015.


The number of people heading through the doors at the Louvre dropped by 15 percent last year compared to 2015 and it's not just the Louvre that's been hit.

An August report noted a 3.9 percent drop in traffic through Charles de Gaulle airport, an 11 percent drop in visitors to Disneyland Paris, and a 14.6 percent drop in the number of Paris hotel reservations.

Another report found that Paris tourism has lost €750 million since terror attacks.

The president of the region's tourist bureau called it an "industrial catastrophe" at the time.

City chiefs were forced to appeal to tourists to follow the example of locals and not be scared.