Okay to be attracted to members of same sex, says Health Ministry

The resource material not only treats the issue of same-sex attraction with unusual maturity but also talks about contraception and gender-based violence in great detail.

Okay to be attracted to members of same sex, says Health Ministry

In first of its kind study material in India, Health Ministry has emphasised that "it's okay" to like a person of the same sex and has tried to quash gender roles by saying "boys can cry."

According to a report in The Indian Express, in a bid to reach out to 26 crore adolescents in the country on health issues, the Health Ministry has decided to involve 1.65 lakh peer educators called “Saathiya”. The resource kit prepared for these educators was unveiled by Health Secretary C K Mishra on Monday and is being seen as a huge step in a country where Homophobia is ingrained, and where the State hasn't legalised same sex marriage., not only treats the issue of same-sex attraction with unusual maturity but also talks about contraception and gender-based violence in great detail.


It not only treats the issue of same-sex attraction with unusual maturity but also talks about contraception and gender-based violence in great detail.

“Yes, adolescents frequently fall in love. They can feel attraction for a friend or any individual of the same or opposite sex. It is normal to have special feelings for someone. It is important for adolescents to understand that such relationships are based on mutual consent, trust, transparency and respect. It is alright to talk about such feelings to the person for whom you have them but always in a respectful manner… Boys should understand that when a girl says ‘no’ it means no,” reads the resource material in Hindi that is going to be circulated to states as part of the adolescent peer-education plan.



The peer educators are being trained under the Rashtriya Kishor Swasthya Karyakram (RKSK). “Despite the expansion of media, there are many unanswered questions in the minds of young people in villages. Saathiya will address these questions. We are also talking about behavioural change and a change in thinking,” Mishra said.
In another of the exemplary statements of the resource material prepared in partnership with the United Nations Population Fund, it attacks stereotypes in the section on mental health where it says it is fine for boys to cry and categorisations such as “sissy” and “tomboy” are inappropriate.

“A boy can cry to give vent to his feelings. He can also be soft-spoken or shy. Being rude and insensitive is not a sign of masculinity. It is alright for boys to like things like cooking and designing that are normally associated with girls; adopting the role of the other gender does not mean that he is not male. The same applies for girls who talk too much or like to dress like boys or play games like boys. It is wrong to label such people as ‘sissy’ or ‘tomboy’.”

The section also deals with addiction, smoking and alcohol laying down their short and long-term harmful effects and also deals with conflict resolution.

The section on reproductive health has information not just about HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases but also exhaustive information on contraceptive options (pills, condoms, IUCDs etc) for both boys and girls, listing masturbation as one of the topmost options for practising “safe sex”. It also has information on abortion and the need for parental or consent of guardian for girls younger than 18 years who want to undergo

It also has information on abortion and the need for parental or consent of guardian for girls younger than 18 years who want to undergo an abortion.

The peer educators will be trained by the Centre and will voluntarily but will be entitled to a non-monetary payment of Rs 50 per month in the form of magazine subscriptions or mobile recharge or 'any other means decided by the state'.