Punjab polls: The high voter turnout in rural areas favour AAP

The anti-incumbency factor against the 10-year rule of the SAD-BJP rule made it firm that this election was about change

Punjab polls: The high voter turnout in rural areas favour AAP

For the 114 seat assembly of Punjab, around 1.4 crore people exercised their rights to choose representatives on Saturday by which the fate of nearly 1,100 candidates can be decided. The election saw a triangular battle between ruling Akali Dal (SAD)- BJP alliance, the Congress and Aam Aadmi Party (AAP), which is a newcomer to the political arena.

Compared to 2012, the state saw a lower turnout this time rounding at  78%. Of the three regions in the state- Majha, Malwa and Doaba - the rural belts of Malwa saw the highest polling with 80% while the border districts of Majha coming up with the lowest turnout of 66%.


Compared to urban regions of Malwa, rural areas found a rise in voter turnouts nearly amounting to 87%. It was due to the surge in the region which sums up 69 seats of the total 117 assembly constituencies. The figures of Election Commission show a record surge in nine districts out of 11 which relatively reaches to more than 80 per cent this time.

GOOD NEWS FOR AAP

According to Janta Ka Reporter, the higher turnout can be considered as good news for the debutant AAP.

The highly spirited campaign by the AAP in Malwa including the down to the earth appeal by the big leaders made people thinking of voting for issues that make them suffer other than looking out for the chief ministerial candidate. The anti-incumbency factor against the 10-year rule of the SAD-BJP rule made it firm that this election was about change.

Then this turnout may help the other two, i.e, the Congress and AAP. But the Congress is seen as a party of older traditions whose ways of doing are very difficult to change.

The Manjha region in Doaba has a corner for the Amarinder Singh-led party, but the low turn out may change the course in favour of AAP.